August 28, 2016

Ohio is Like No Other State by Tamera Lynn Kraft



I was born in Ohio and have lived here all my life. Ohio truly is the heart of the nation in many ways. It has a bit of everything: big city life, sports teams small quaint towns, Amish Country, mountains, grassy plain, a great lake, and a mighty river. Most people don’t know the rich heritage Ohio has to offer.

Ohio has a historical heritage like no other state. Throughout history, this Midwest state that has roots in New England and West Virginia has been in the thick of things. During the days of the US Revolution, England wanted to keep the colonies from settling in the West otherwise known as Ohio. Schoenbrunn Village, the first settlement in Ohio, was a missionary village to the Lenape Indians and had the first coed and multi-racial school in America. During the days leading up to the Civil War, Ohio led the way for abolitionists and rebel rousers such as John Brown from Akron. The rescue of a fugitive slave in Oberlin, Ohio almost caused Ohio to leave the Union because of the Fugitive Slave Law two years before the Civil War broke
out. In the early days of Women’s Suffrage, Ohio again was in the middle of things hosting a conference that featured Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman” speech. During the mid-twentieth century, Ohio was a leader in industry with Cleveland, Akron, and Dayton playing major roles. In today’s world, Ohio is still leading the way in deciding elections and public opinion.

Ohio is the state of presidents. Most people don’t know this, but more presidents claimed Ohio as their home state than any other state including Virginia. Virginia had more presidents actually born in the state, but William Henry Harrison, the first Ohio president, was born in Virginia and moved to Ohio to make the state his home. Other presidents from Ohio were Ulysses S. Grant (the Civil War general), Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Benjamin Harrison (grandson of William Henry Harrison), William McKinley
(assassinated in office), William Howard Taft, and Warren G. Harding. There were eight presidents from Ohio and seven who were born in Ohio. Harding, Hayes, and McKinley have historical sites you can visit.

Ohio is the state of inventors. Many inventers were born in Ohio. Wilbur and Orville Wright, the inventors of the airplane, lived near Dayton. Charles Kettering invented the electric engine starter for cars and the cash register. Granville Woods, an African American born in 1856, invented overhead electric train wires, the train telegraph service, automated railroad breaks, and the egg incubator. Garrett Morgan, another African American, invented the stoplight and the gasmask. Thomas Midgley invented ethyl gasoline. There were many more inventors from Ohio. Probably the man who invented more devices than any other, Thomas
Edison, was born in Milan, Ohio in 1847. You can tour the Thomas Edison Birthplace Museum in Milan, Ohio.

Ohio is a state of tourism. There is plenty to do and see in Ohio. Ohio has one of the great lakes, Lake Erie, bordering its northern border. To the south, is the Ohio River which feeds into the Mississippi. To the southeast are the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Hocking Hills has caves and hiking trails to explore. To the northeast are the Cuyahoga Valley National Metro parks and canals. If you’re not into nature, you
can spend a relaxing day shopping in Amish Country and eating at one of our many Amish Restaurant. Ohio is the state with the largest Amish Community. You could also go to Cedar Point Amusement Park with the most roller coasters in the world, the Cincinnati or Cleveland Zoos, the Canton Football Hall of Fame, or the Cleveland Rock Hall of Fame. You can top off your visit with the Dayton Wright Patterson Airforce Base. It has more historical airplanes than even the Smithsonian. Make sure you allow yourself two days to see it all.

Prizes: This week I’m giving away a paperback copy of my new novella, Resurrection of  Hope, and a jar of Apple Butter from the Amish Door Restaurant in Wilmot Ohio to one lucky winner (US only). To enter the drawing, tell me which place in Ohio you would love to visit or something about Ohio that surprised you.

To learn more about me and my books, click on this link. http://tameralynnkraft.net or you can find me at these sites.
Word Sharpeners Blog: http://tameralynnkraft.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tamerakraft
(Info Provided by Author)

10 comments:

Renaissance Women said...

I knew Ohio was full of history, just not quite that much. Thank you for the eye opening information! Doris McCraw/Angela Raines-author

traveler said...

Ohio is historic, and has the name rust belt because of the origins which were dominant and vital to its growth. Cleveland interests me for its entrepeneurship opportunities and revitalization of neighborhoods.

petite said...

Ohio interests me from the historical perspective as well as the industrial and scenic. Learning about the many Carnegie Libraries located in Ohio, the manufacturing and the Cleveland Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is fascinating. An interesting book written by Ted Gup is a treasure. Thanks for this captivating post.

Tamera Lynn Kraft said...

Thanks, Renaissance Women. Most people don't know all OHio has to offer.

Tamera Lynn Kraft said...

Thanks, Traveler. Cleveland has made great improvements in the last few years.

Mark R Hunter said...

And don't forget all the Buckeye astronauts!

I poke a little fun at Ohio in my new book about Indiana, but it is all in fun--it's a great state, and several of my relatives live there.

Tamera Lynn Kraft said...

You're welcome, Petite.\

Tamera Lynn Kraft said...

I ran out of room, Mark. But you're right. Many astronauts came from Ohio including John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, and Judy Resnik.

Fiona McGier said...

I'm surprised that there are foothills and caves in Ohio, which I've always thought of as flat, flat, and more flat. I have a sister-in-law living in Cincinnati, and another living in Hilliard who, when I made her an afghan, asked for it in Ohio State colors of red, grey and white. But when we've gone to see them, it's mile after mile of flatlands. We'll have to check out the caves and hills someday. Thanks!

Tamera Lynn Kraft said...

Fiona, The western part of the state is flat, but NE Ohio has rolling hills, and SE Ohio is part of the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.