October 28, 2012

Welcome to Texas! Celia Yeary



No matter where we travel--foreign or domestic--someone remarks, "You're from Texas!" How do they know this? They say by the way I speak, which always startles me a little. In my mind, I speak like the young women reporters on Fox News or CNN. But when I make a recording for my phone messages, I cringe--yes, indeedy, I do have a Texas twang. The next statement invariably is, "I was in Texas once...." And off that person goes on a tale of visiting Texas.
 
To date, not one person during all these trips disparaged Texas. I say this because others do, and truly...I don't mind. It's a matter of perspective. General Sheridan, in marching across Texas during the Civil War, made the famous statement, "If I owned Hell and Texas, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell." With no central air conditioning, I probably would have had the same attitude.

Why do I love Texas?
Texas is an "Attitude." Texas has a mystique that closely resembles a religion. Even with all the citizen diversity, occasional squabbles, and newcomers somewhat changing the atmosphere, we have a tight relationship that might not exist any other place in America.
Texas is Vast. Not just big...but huge. The empty spaces in Texas could house some nations--if only there were enough water.
Texas consists of seven different geographical regions, much like having seven different states within one border. If one doesn't like living in the East Texas Piney Woods, he can live in the mountains of West Texas, or the high South Plains in Northwest Texas, or the Gulf Coast.
Texas does everything big. You see, when we win--we win big. And when we lose--we lose big. There you go--everything is bigger, even our losses. How many citizens would have barricaded themselves within a chapel and fort called the Alamo and dared Santa Anna to come and fight, knowing they would all die? And what has Texas done with the Alamo? We've made it a shrine--to the biggest loss we have suffered.

Things I Love About Texas:
Bluebonnets--the herald to spring.
Mexican food, What-a-Burger, Dairy Queen, Manske Rolls.
Mustang Island, the beach on the Gulf Coast, Big Bend National Park, Whitetail deer, Historic courthouses, small towns, large cities.
Our ancestors and heroes. 
It's my home.

I am a Native Texan, and wouldn't live anywhere else. One of my ancestors, John Jefferson Hughes, came to Texas as a young teenage boy, and a few years later joined Texas in its fight for independence from Mexico. Because he lived here when Texas was a Republic, I am member of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT).

I am a romance author. Some of my stories are historical, and some are contemporary, but every one of them is set somewhere in Texas. It's what I know best.
 My first novels were set in historic Texas. Recently, two of those have been reissued with a new publisher, revised and updated with new covers, and for the first time, in print, as well as ebook.








Celia Yeary-Romance...and a little bit 'o Texas

25 comments:

Sarah J. McNeal said...

I loved this blog about Texas, Celia. It was filled with your love for your home state and made me love it, too. I lived in Texas for a while and found Texas to be among the most friendly people I ever met. You have a heart as big as Texas, Celia.

Dac said...

I'm with you, Celia. I have two homes - Georgia and Texas. And I write about Texas. When a reader of mine visits Texas, I get an e-mail, or even better, a phone call -- "I'm standing outside the Alamo!"

Don't forget Corpus Christi - on the hills covered with Purple Sage after a rain.

Linda Swift said...

Good morning, Celia. I enjoyed reading about your love of Texas. I envy you these roots in one place. I am a nomad and though I am a native of Kentucky, my roots have crept to Missouri, Tennessee, Florida and states all over. Your vivid descriptions of Texas reflect your love in every book you write and I've read them all. So please keep those wonderful stories of Texas coming!

Celia Yeary said...

Annette- thank you for allowing me to be on your 50 Authors-50 States blog. It's a popular site, and so I feel honored.

Barbara Edwards said...

Thanks for sharing about your home state. I do want to visit such a great place. Maybe next year.

jrlindermuth said...

Your affection for your home-state shines through, Celia. I've been there and have kin living in Texas. Thanks for sharing your impressions.

Maggie Toussaint said...

I like your take on the Alamo, a shrine to Texas' biggest loss. I think that sentiment is true about Southerners in general. You may beat us, but we will never forget it. When I grew up, people where still talking about the War. Not any of the World Wars or Korea or even Vietnam. The Big War, The War between the States.

But I'm really glad to know a native Texan and to experience the joys of your state through your eyes.

Caroline Clemmons said...

Celia, love this post, of course, since I'm also a Texan. I especially liked the comment about housing several nations if only there were enough water! Your new cover for TEXAS PROMISE is the prettiest cover I have ever seen. I've read the book but may buy it in print just to look at the cover.

Debby said...

Your blog really made me smile. I did live in Texas for a bit when my father was stationed there. You sound like you really love Texas.
debby236 at gmail dot com

Celia Yeary said...

Sarah--I like that--a heart as big as Texas. You are such a wonderful person, one of the most generous I have known--thank you for your comments.

Celia Yeary said...

DAC--you can take the boy out of Texas, but you can't take Texas out of the boy! That's you, my friend.

Celia Yeary said...

Linda--I'm glad we differ on the nomad thing--I'm so glad I wasn't. Oh, we moved around when I was younger, but not far each time. Certainly not to another state.
And I'm trying to write more Texas books...so little time....Thanks!

Celia Yeary said...

Barbara--be sure to come in early spring!

Celia Yeary said...

Hi, JR--thanks for visiting the blog, and come back to Texas for another visit soon.

Celia Yeary said...

Thanks, Debby--I'm so glad you enjoyed it.

Kristy McCaffrey said...

Loved your post Celia! I'm a native Arizonan but must admit there's something special about Texas, which is probably why I set my first book there. Studying the history is like learning about an entire country in and of itself. It's wide, vast, and oddly special.

Joyce Henderson said...

Hi Celia
Glad I noticed this blog. I don't look at everything, but occasionally I find "gold." :) As a born Texan, I envy your years of staying put.

I, too, write all my books set in Texas. Central Texas and hill country since I was born in Gatesville. I have relatives from Galveston to Dallas, and a myriad of stops in between. Last year my ever lovin' and I spent ten days at my aunt's in Houston where we had a family reunion and I had the opportunity to visit with all the "outlaws" I call kin. Great fun.

Thanks for the nostalgic look at the place I still call home even though I haven't lived there since 1953.





LKF said...

Thanks for sharing about Texas. I'm from Houston but was transferred to Arkansas 11 years ago. I still go home quite often and do miss it, especially when it snows here. Thanks for sharing.
Lynda

Celia Yeary said...

Maggie--I've heard that about the Southern states, the The War was the Civil War. It's like Texas and the battle for independence from Mexico. You'd think it happened just last week.
Thanks for visiting...

Celia Yeary said...

Thank you, Caroline--I'm glad you like the cover for Texas Promise. I wanted an old oil derrick, but they were ugly--so we decided on a windmill.

Celia Yeary said...

LKF--well, you're not far away! I'm glad you come back and visit. Thanks for commenting.

Celia Yeary said...

Joyce--I'm so happy you did click on the link and came on over! My settings are most often Central Texas and the Hill Country, too--that's where I live. But I've also lived in Houston, out near Lubbock, and near Fort Worth. I'll take Central Texas! Thanks for visitng here.

Celia Yeary said...

Kristy--I remember where you live. Many author set stories in Texas even though they don't live here. Me? I can see me setting a story in New Hamshire or Florida or Utah. Thanks for coming by.

Debbie Kump said...

Enjoyed your post, Celia! Thanks for sharing your love of your state and best wishes for your re-releases!

Allison Knight said...

I loved your description of Texas and it takes forever to drive across the state. One other thing. We found out that Texans drive at only one speed - fast.